Virginity, the myth of the broken hymen that persists in the 21st century despite having no scientific basis

Virginity, the myth of the broken hymen that persists in the 21st century despite having no scientific basis

  • laura plit
  • BBC News World

Ellen Støkken Dahl (right) and Nina Dølvik Brochmann (left)

image source, TED TALK

Caption,

Ellen Støkken Dahl (right) and Nina Dølvik Brochmann (left), debunk the myth of virginity during a TED Talk by using a hula hoop to represent the idea of ​​the hymen that many still have in their minds.

Virginity is a farce, Ellen Støkken Dahl and Nina Dølvik Brochmann say, and armed with one of those hula hoops coated with a delicate transparent plastic film, they decided to explain it to their audience.

Brochmann holds it and Dahl smashes it with a powerful slap.

The scene, performed at a TED conference in Oslo by these two Norwegian doctors and writers, powerfully illustrates an idea most of us grew up with: that the first time a woman has vaginal intercourse, the hymen it breaks and, as a result, bleeds. And in that moment virginity is lost.

Despite the speech of the authors of “The book of the vagina: everything you need to know and you never dared to ask” took place in 2017, and the fact that the the hymen does not undergo a change after intercourse As a fact recognized by the medical sciences for more than 100 years, the idea that this part of the female body can reveal her sexual history is still prevalent in our society.